Krakatoa Volcano

The Krakatau Volcanic activity recommenced in May, 1883, and continued into August, the first eruptions appearing on the northern, Perbuatan volcano. The number of active vents increased on both the northern volcanoes. On the 26th and 27th August a series of cataclysmic explosions occurred which w See more details

Bromo Volcano

Bromo Volcano is a landscape that's as evocative and resonant any in Southeast Asia, and the raw material for countless legend and as many picture post cards. Compared with Java's other major peaks, Bromo Volcano (2392m) it self is a relative midget, but this volcano's beauty is in its setting, no See more details

Borobudur Temple

Like Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Bagan in Myanmar, Java's Borobudur make the rest of Southeast Asia's spectacular sites seem almost incidental. Looming out of a path work of bottle-green paddies and swaying palm tops, this colossal Buddhist relic is one of the continent's marvels, surviving Mountai See more details

Baduy Tribe Cultural

The Baduy or Badui, who call themselves Kanekes, are a traditional community living in the western part of the Indonesia province of Banten, near Rangkasbitung. Their population of between 5.000 and 8.000 is centered in the Kendeng mountains at an elevation of 300-500 meters above sea level. Their See more details

Prambanan Temple

The grandest and most evocative Hindu temple complex in Java features some 50 temples site. Many of these were damaged by the large earth quake that struck the region in 2006, and the main temples were off limits at the time of research, though the hope the reopen most of the site by the time you See more details

Bandung West Java

Big, burly Bandung comes like a rush of blood to the after the verdant mountains around Cibodas. Once doubled ”Paris Van Java ”today there’s little left to admire in a city centre that’s prone to Jakarta-style congestion-but if you rummage throughout the concrete sprawl, old pockets of int See more details

Ujung Kulon National Park

On the remote Southwestern tip of Java, the beauty of Ujung Kulon National Park covers about 760 sq km of land area, including the large Panaitan Island. Because of its isolation and difficult access, Ujung Kulon has remained an out post of primeval forest and untouched wilderness in heavily devel See more details

Tangkuban Parahu Volcano

Thirty kilometers north of Bandung. Tangkuban Parahu literally ”overturned boat” Is a huge active volcanic crater. Legend tells of a God challenged to build a huge boat during a single night. His opponent, on seeing that he would probably complete this impossible task, brought the sun up early See more details

Cijulang Green Canyon

The most incredible tourist destination to visit the Green Canyon. And it's takes around half an hour from Pangandaran Beach. See more details

Kampung Naga

Tour Campoeng Naga (Dragoon Village Cultural Conservation) Kampeong Naga is a traditional village and museum piece of Sudanese architectures and village life. It is home to 110 families, who preserve the old ways of life despite the crowds of tourists that pass trough here during the peak season. See more details

Merapi Volcano

Few of Southeast Asia’s volcanoes are as evocative, or as destructive, as Mountain Merapi (Fire Mountain) towering 2911m over the surrounding plains, this immense Fujiesque Pyramids looms over Yogyakarta, Borobudur and Prambanan like an invitation to the end of the world. It has erupted dozens o See more details

Bogor Botanical Garden

Know throughout Java as Kota Hujan (City Rain) and Bogor became a home from Sir Stamford Raffles during the British Interregnum, a respite for those ma dogs and English men that preferred not to go out in the midday sun. These days, this once quiet town is practically becoming a suburb of Jakarta See more details
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Borobudur Temple

borobudur temple

Like Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Bagan in Myanmar, Java's Borobudur make the rest of Southeast Asia's spectacular sites seem almost incidental. Looming out of a path work of bottle-green paddies and swaying palm tops, this colossal Buddhist relic is one of the continent's marvels, surviving Mountain Merapi's ash flows, terrorist bombs, and the wear and tear of a millions pairs and beautiful as it must have been 1200 years ago.

Rulers of Saliendra dynasty built Borobudur some time from AD 750-850. Litle else is known about Borobudur's early history, but the Saliendras must have recruited a huge work force, as some 60.000 cubic meters of some had to be hewn, transported and carved during its construction. The name Borobudur is possibly derived from the Sanskrit Words "Vihara Buddhist Uhr" which means Buddhist Monastery on the hill.

With the decline of Buddhism and the shift of power to East Java, Borobudur was abandoned soon after completion and for centuries lay forgotten, buried under lyres of volcanic ash; it was only in 1815 when Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles governed Java, that the site was cleared and the sheer magnitude of the builder’s imagination and technical skill was revealed. Early in the 200th century the Dutch began to tackle the restoration of Borobudur, but over the years the supporting hill had become waterlogged and the whole immense stone mass started to subside. A mammoth US $ 25 millions restoration project was under taken between 1973 and 1983. After countless lighting trikes and a number of injuries, a lighting conductor, specially shipped in from New York City was added to the structure at this time.

On 21 January 1985, bombs planted by the opponents of Soeharto exploded on the upper layers of Borobudur. Many of the smaller stupas were damaged, but it has once again been fully restored, demonstrating the structure's time less resilience. Borobudur's latest test will be to survive falling visitor’s numbers following the Bali blast.